Why RAID Can Be Bad For Business

RAID is often touted as the silver bullet in data storage. Increased storage capacity, resistance from hardware failures and improved performance. While these are all valid upsides to a RAID setup, there are also a few downsides which need to be addressed.

1. Extra Storage.

RAID can allow for a huge pool of storage, but with that storage comes great responsibility. You should factor in at least enough capacity to backup the RAID data somewhere else. If you can only afford 8TB of storage then you should only use 4TB for data and the other 4TB to back it up; Preferably on another machine / standalone system.

2. Redundancy.

The first letter in RAID stands for redundancy. This means you can afford to lose a certain number of disks without losing access to your data.  This also means that if you have a disk failure you need to get it replaced immediately, otherwise you’re running without redundancy.

3. Downtime.

Nobody likes downtime. If your 16TB RAID array goes offline without a backup then you have a couple of options. One option is to attempt to get the RAID back online by replacing disks, rebuilding the array etc, but this is risky. If this is your only copy of the data then rebuilding / reformatting the RAID could corrupt the data beyond recovery. Don’t do this if you don’t have a backup to fall back on.

The second and preferable option is to get the RAID professionally recovered. When we receive a RAID, the first thing we do is make images of all disks. This allows us to work on the RAID without risk. Then we use a read-only process to extract the data onto another form of storage. This is where downtime comes in. Unless you go for an emergency process, you could have to make do without the data for a number of days.

So What’s The Way Forward?

It’s one word. Redundancy.

Whatever you do, make sure your data is replicated across as many types of storage as possible. In an ideal world you would have a duplicate system running alongside the live system, which can take over if anything goes wrong. Then have the data on another type of storage, which you can access from somewhere else. Imagine if the RAID controller failed, and you could only access the data from that one machine.

It doesn’t matter how many backups you have if they all require the same system to access them.

I’ve only just scratched the surface here, but you should always look to make extra copies of your data. It may seem redundant now, but when your server fails containing all your data, all your accounts, all your client details and your website, you’ll be glad you kept that extra copy.

2 Replies to “Why RAID Can Be Bad For Business”

  1. The main issue I see is failure to correctly maintain these arrays. Quite possibly the biggest problem I face is recovery of RAID5 arrays where it has run in degraded mode for a period of time before a secondary disk failure rendering it 2 disks offline with information on the initially failed member becoming stale..

    1. Yes Alyn. This is one of the points I was making. We often see RAIDs that have been running in degraded mode for so long that the users had stopped noticing the warning lights and alerts until it was too late. If it’s not redundant, it’s not RAID!

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